Korean, Japanese, Indonesian Cooking

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Courtesy of Pickles and Tea – yellow rice piled and arranged like a pineapple

Asia is very famous for its traditional and diversified cuisines.  In China alone, there are at least 12 popular regional cuisines (my personal favourite is Cantonese, Chiuchow/Teochew, and Shanghainese) you can come across.

Cooking is certainly daunting for many but looks easy for many others, too.  But I know that it is really through trial and error, lots of hard work, and talents that lead to the delicious recipes.  Here are the talents whom I learn some of the local Asian cookings from – online thanks to YouTube and the blogs!  I hope you would enjoy these as much as I do.

Korea – Maangchi.com

I first came across Maanghi (name of her website) when I was attending an Asian food demo at the local Asian Art Museum when the presenter said that this was her go-to Korean website to learn cooking.  I have felt in love with this lady and her cooking (blog and online) ever since.  And her newsletter is a bomb.  Check out one of her most popular posts – Kimchi and this very popular Korean stew dish at Korean restaurants – Kimchi Soft Tofu Stew

Japan – Nami Chen’s Just One Cookbook and her Youtube channel

With 2 million page views on her Just One Cookbook Facebook/Blog/YouTube channels, Nami is one of the most popular Japanese American bloggers on Japanese cooking and she also studied in the Bay Area (what a cool photo!).  She also shared many aspects of traditional Japanese culture and her travel experiences which are a joy to read.  Check out this simple Omurice (Western-influenced Japanese omelette rice) and my oh so favourite Green Tea Latte video amongst many others (like this Japanese cheesecake one).

South-East Asian (Indonesia & Thai) – Pat Tanumihardja’s Pickles and Tea

I have recently enjoyed reading Pat’s cookbook called “Farm to Table Asian Secrets” and am impressed by the many flavours of the South-East Asian cooking that can be replicated at home.  She also uses fresh and seasonal farmers’ market ingredients, which are always a plus.  She also write about other SE Asian cuisines (Indian, Vietnamese, etc.) You would enjoy this Yellow Rice (Nasi Tumpeng) and the Chicken Tikka Masala (which is actually a British national food and not an authentic Indian cuisine!)

 

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